Planned down to the last detail

All considerations were taken into account when a new section – the heaviest ever hoisted in the North Sea Hall – was installed on the drilling support module for the Sverdrup platform this week.

All considerations were taken into account when a new section – the heaviest ever hoisted in the North Sea Hall – was installed on the drilling support module for the Sverdrup platform this week.
All images: Øyvind Sætre.

Never before have the cranes in the hall seen more strenuous work: Yesterday the 310 ton section 522 was hoisted onto the drilling support module (DSM) for the Sverdrup platform.

“We have an incredibly skilled workforce at the yard, who did an amazing job during the hoist. Everything went really well”, says a beaming Geir Arne Emberland, who has responsibility for hoisting during the construction of the Sverdrup module.

The hoisting of the latest section, which arrived in Haugesund from Poland last weekend, had been planned for some time.

“The initial preparation was done as early as the design phase, when the project's fabrication and engineering teams worked together to determine hoisting points and ensure that the section wasn't too heavy for the cranes in the hall,” Emberland explains.

All considerations were taken into account when a new section – the heaviest ever hoisted in the North Sea Hall – was installed on the drilling support module for the Sverdrup platform this week.

As the hoist approached, the environment in the hall was scrutinized. Scaffoldings, steel and other materials that blocked the hoist were cleared away. Prior to the operation a safe job analysis was also carried out.

“Here we reviewed the entire operation, step by step. We note all potential challenges and hazards and discuss how to handle them. There's no risk that the actual module will drop, but if we were to forget a loose object on it, it could cause great harm should it fall. There's also a risk of crushing injuries,” Emberland says.

Paying close attention
In the case of operations such as these, as well as in all other activities on the project, the safety services pay close attention in order ensure sound working conditions. As the coordinating safety representative, Rune Eriksson was involved as early as the planning stage. 

“Hoisting operations are planned down to the last detail to ensure safety. The safety services make sure everything has been done and pay close attention throughout the process. During the actual hoisting operation it is the safety services in the executing department that takes part in the safety assessment and follow up the practical work,” he explains.

All considerations were taken into account when a new section – the heaviest ever hoisted in the North Sea Hall – was installed on the drilling support module for the Sverdrup platform this week.
Geir Arne Emberland (left) is responsible for all hosting operations during the construction of the Sverdrup module. Rune Eriksson is the Coordinating Safety Representative.

The safety services are involved in everything that has to do with HSE in the project, from working environment assessments to choice of products and planning of major operations. Eriksson says cooperation with project management is good.

“Instead of just trailing after management and pursuing matters that are below standard, we are involved in the day-to-day work. This gives us an opportunity to do an even better job,” he feels.

Busy autumn
With section 522 in place, the Sverdrup project is really getting up to speed in Haugesund. The project currently involves around 400 associates at the yard.

All considerations were taken into account when a new section – the heaviest ever hoisted in the North Sea Hall – was installed on the drilling support module for the Sverdrup platform this week.

“Now the new section will be welded to the section below. Then we can start work on assembling pipes on the bottom deck, while also rigging equipment on the actual sections,” says construction manager Bjørn Pedersen.

Two storeys of the drilling support module are now in place, but three sections still await outside the hall. They will comprise a pipe rack and will be hoisted in one after the other later on in October.

“It's busy, but fun. By the end of the month we are expecting a new shipment of more sections from Poland,” the construction manager says. 

Published 2016-10-06, 14:40 CET Updated 2016-10-06, 14:43 CET

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