Saves 100 million

By thinking in new ways, challenging accepted truths and making smart choices it is quite possible to significantly cut project costs. Few are more aware of this than the team behind Maria Water Injection from Heidrun.

For the project associates, savings have been on the agenda from day one. Initially, through optimising the study that was carried out prior to the project. It proved that several of the tasks could be resolved in smarter ways.

“According to the original plan, a separate lifeboat structure was to be built. Instead, we found room for the lifeboat on the water treatment module that the project is delivering. That alone represented significant savings,” says project manager Per Tore Larsen.

By thinking in new ways, challenging accepted truths and making smart choices, it is quite possible to significantly cut project costs. Few are more aware of this than the team behind Maria Water Injection from Heidrun.
The Maria project team – recognised by extensive experience, broad expertise and great versatility (All images: Øyvind Sætre).

The project also realised that it could deliver a better solution for a planned membrane skid. Instead of purchasing a complete equipment skid, Aibel used internal competence to design the structure around the equipment, including walls, doors and outfitting. This gave the engineers more leeway with regard to design, and ensured a large cut in procurement costs.

A joint project
Close collaboration between the various disciplines yields benefits – again and again. Extensive experience, broad expertise and great versatility are all key elements to making Aibel unique. The good solutions arise through close collaboration across the company. In the Maria project the saving measures arise throughout the company, and almost all are implemented.

“Every month we name the saving measure of the month and celebrate the results we have achieved so far. The savings don't provide Aibel with any direct financial gain, but we have everything to gain by creating good results for the customer,” Per Tore Larsen believes.

Guro Marlene Mathisen and Kristin Huseland from the Maria project.
Guro Marlene Mathisen (left), cost-efficiency coordinator, and Kristin Huseland, materials engineer. 

Systematic work
Guro Marlene Mathisen is cost-efficiency coordinator on the Maria project. She lets us know that the organisation is working systematically to identify opportunities for savings.

“The entire organisation contributes with proposals for savings. Proposed saving measures are reviewed weekly with the heads of disciplines at Engineering. It is also a fixed item on the agenda in our internal planning meetings and in meetings with the customer,” she says.

Her colleague Kristin Huseland, a materials engineer, finds looking for the most cost-effective solutions an interesting challenge. She found that the project could save more than NOK 10 million through a change of materials.

“According to the technical requirements, all seawater lines in the Maria project were to be designed and built using titanium. Thorough investigations showed that Superduplex was good enough,” she tells.

Both women believe there is much to gain by thinking outside the box.

“In order to find the most cost-effective solutions, we have to challenge requirements and standards – we have to think twice,” they conclude.

In total, the project is in line to save up to NOK 100 million.

By thinking in new ways, challenging accepted truths and making smart choices, it is quite possible to significantly cut project costs. Few are more aware of this than the team behind Maria Water Injection from Heidrun.

For more information, please download the brochure “Cost efficiency in every project”.

Published 2016-08-26, 14:15 CET Updated 2016-08-26, 14:30 CET

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